Negotiating in bad faith

An Uncomplicated Mind Apr 11, 2014 at 3:16 pm
In his novel, The Dogs of War (1974), Frederick Forsyth wrote about a group of mercenary soldiers hired to depose a fictional government in Africa. Forsyth called this group the dogs of war, much like the wild pack of soldiers Shakespeare referred to in his play, Julius Caesar.
But when the Philippine military named the two dogs and a cat they took into custody during the recent arrest of two high-ranking members of the Communist Party of the Philippines (CPP) as “Ben,” “Wilma” and “Joma,” obviously after the top leaders of the Communist movement, it was a cheap shot, an unfair and malicious attack against their prized captives. On other hand, Forsyth’s dogs of war could probably aptly describe the military like a wild bunch unleashed to pounce on their hated adversaries.
Top leaders of the Communist Party of the Philippines, Benito Tiamzon and his wife Wilma Austria raise their fists in defiance on their way to their hastily arranged inquest in Manila after being arrested in Cebu last March 22.

Top leaders of the Communist Party of the Philippines, Benito Tiamzon and his wife Wilma Austria raise their fists in defiance on their way to their hastily arranged inquest in Manila after being arrested in Cebu last March 22.

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